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TechnipFMC plc Availability of 2018 U.K. Annual Report

03.15.2019

LONDON & PARIS & HOUSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar. 15, 2019-- Regulatory News:

TechnipFMC plc (“TechnipFMC”) (NYSE:FTI) (Paris:FTI) (ISIN:GB00BDSFG982) announces that its U.K. Annual Report and IFRS Financial Statements for the period ended 31 December 2018 (“2018 Annual Report”) have been published.

A copy of the 2018 Annual Report has been submitted to the U.K. National Storage Mechanism and is, or will shortly be, available for inspection at www.morningstar.co.uk/uk/NSM, and can also be found on the TechnipFMC website (https://investors.technipfmc.com/events-presentations/agm).

TechnipFMC’s annual general meeting will be held on 10:00 a.m., London time, on Wednesday, 1 May 2019 at TechnipFMC’s offices at One St. Paul’s Churchyard, London, EC4M 8AP, United Kingdom.

Compliance with Disclosure and Transparency Rule (“DTR”) 6.3.5 – Extracts from the 2018 Annual Report

The information below, which is extracted from the 2018 Annual Report, is included solely for the purpose of complying with DTR 6.3.5 and the requirements it imposes on issuers as to how to make public annual financial reports. It should be read in conjunction with TechnipFMC’s preliminary results announcement released on 20 February 2019. This announcement is not a substitute for reading the full 2018 Annual Report. Page, note, and section references in the text below refer to page numbers, note and section references in the 2018 Annual Report.

About TechnipFMC

TechnipFMC is a global leader in subsea, onshore/offshore, and surface projects. With our proprietary technologies and production systems, integrated expertise, and comprehensive solutions, we are transforming our clients’ project economics.

We are uniquely positioned to deliver greater efficiency across project lifecycles from concept to project delivery and beyond. Through innovative technologies and improved efficiencies, our offering unlocks new possibilities for our clients in developing their oil and gas resources.

Each of our more than 37,000 employees is driven by a steady commitment to clients and a culture of purposeful innovation, challenging industry conventions, and rethinking how the best results are achieved.

To learn more about us and how we are enhancing the performance of the world’s energy industry, go to TechnipFMC.com and follow us on Twitter @TechnipFMC.

Appendix A – Directors’ Responsibility Statements

The directors are responsible for our U.K. Annual Report, containing the Strategic Report, this Directors’ Report, the Directors’ Remuneration Report, the Corporate Governance Report, and the financial statements contained herein, in accordance with applicable law and regulations. The Companies Act requires the directors to prepare financial statements for each financial year. Under that law the directors have prepared the consolidated financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board and as adopted by the European Union and Company financial statements in accordance with United Kingdom Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (United Kingdom Accounting Standards, comprising FRS 101 “Reduced Disclosure Framework”, and applicable law).

Under the Companies Act, the directors must not approve financial statements unless they are satisfied that they give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries and of the profit or loss of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries for that period.

In preparing these financial statements, the directors are required to:

  • select suitable accounting policies and then apply them consistently;
  • make judgements and accounting estimates that are reasonable and prudent;
  • state whether applicable IFRS as adopted by the European Union have been followed for the consolidated financial statements and United Kingdom Accounting Standards, comprising FRS 101, have been followed for the Company financial statements, subject to any material departures disclosed and explained in the financial statements; and
  • prepare the financial statements on the going concern basis unless it is inappropriate to presume that the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries will continue in business.

The directors are responsible for ensuring that the Company keeps adequate accounting records that are sufficient to show and explain the Company’s and its consolidated subsidiaries’ transactions and disclose with reasonable accuracy at any time the financial position of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries and enable them to ensure that the financial statements and the U.K. Annual Report comply with the Companies Act and, as regards the consolidated financial statements, Article 4 of the E.U. IAS Regulation. They are also responsible for safeguarding the assets of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries and for taking reasonable steps for the prevention and detection of fraud and other irregularities.

The directors are responsible for the maintenance and integrity of the Company’s website. Legislation in the United Kingdom governing the preparation and dissemination of financial statements may differ from legislation in other jurisdictions.

Statement as to the U.K. Annual Report

The directors consider that this U.K. Annual Report and financial statements, taken as a whole, is fair, balanced, and understandable and provides the information necessary for shareholders to assess the Company’s and its consolidated subsidiaries’ performance, business model and strategy.

Each of the directors, whose names and functions are listed in the section entitled “Directors” of this Report, confirms that to the best of his/her knowledge:

a. the financial statements, prepared in accordance with applicable accounting standards, give a true and fair view of the assets, liabilities, financial position, and profit or loss of the Company and the undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole; and

b. the Directors’ Report and Strategic Report include a fair review of the development or performance of the business and the position of the Company and the undertakings included in the consolidation taken as a whole, together with a description of the principal risks and uncertainties that it faces.

Statement as to Disclosure to Auditors

The directors confirm that:

c. so far as they are each aware, there is no relevant audit information of which the Company’s and its consolidated subsidiaries’ auditor is unaware; and

d. they have each taken all the steps that they ought to have taken as a director in order to make themselves aware of any relevant audit information and to establish that the Company’s and its consolidated subsidiaries’ auditor is aware of that information.

Appendix B – Principal risks and uncertainties

The principal risks and uncertainties at set out in the Strategic Report of the 2018 Annual Report are set out below in full and unedited text.

You should carefully consider the specific risks and uncertainties set forth below and the other information contained within this Strategic Report, as these are important factors that could cause the Company’s actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from our expected or historical results.

We operate in a highly competitive environment and unanticipated changes relating to competitive factors in our industry, including ongoing industry consolidation, may impact our results of operations.

We compete on the basis of a number of different factors, such as product offerings, project execution, customer service, and price. In order to compete effectively we must develop and implement innovative technologies and processes, and execute our clients’ projects effectively. We can give no assurances that we will continue to be able to compete effectively with the products and services or prices offered by our competitors.

Our industry, including our customers and competitors, has experienced unanticipated changes in recent years. Moreover, the industry is undergoing vertical and horizontal consolidation to create economies of scale and control the value chain, which may affect demand for our products and services because of price concessions for our competitors or decreased customer capital spending. This consolidation activity could impact our ability to maintain market share, maintain or increase pricing for our products and services or negotiate favorable contract terms with our customers and suppliers, which could have a significant negative impact on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows. We are unable to predict what effect consolidations and other competitive factors in the industry may have on prices, capital spending by our customers, our selling strategies, our competitive position, our ability to retain customers or our ability to negotiate favorable agreements with our customers.

Demand for our products and services depends on oil and gas industry activity and expenditure levels, which are directly affected by trends in the demand for and price of crude oil and natural gas.

We are substantially dependent on conditions in the oil and gas industry, including (i) the level of exploration, development and production activity, (ii) capital spending, and (iii) the processing of oil and natural gas in refining units, petrochemical sites, and natural gas liquefaction plants by energy companies that are our customers. Any substantial or extended decline in these expenditures may result in the reduced pace of discovery and development of new reserves of oil and gas and the reduced exploration of existing wells, which could adversely affect demand for our products and services and, in certain instances, result in the cancellation, modification, or re-scheduling of existing orders in our backlog. These factors could have an adverse effect on our revenue and profitability. The level of exploration, development, and production activity is directly affected by trends in oil and natural gas prices, which historically have been volatile and are likely to continue to be volatile in the future.

Factors affecting the prices of oil and natural gas include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • demand for hydrocarbons, which is affected by worldwide population growth, economic growth rates, and general economic and business conditions;
  • costs of exploring for, producing, and delivering oil and natural gas;
  • political and economic uncertainty, and socio-political unrest;
  • government policies and subsidies related to the production, use, and exportation/importation of oil and natural gas;
  • available excess production capacity within the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) and the level of oil production by non-OPEC countries;
  • oil refining and transportation capacity and shifts in end-customer preferences toward fuel efficiency and the use of natural gas;
  • technological advances affecting energy consumption;
  • development, exploitation, and relative price, and availability of alternative sources of energy and our customers’ shift of capital to the development of these sources;
  • volatility in, and access to, capital and credit markets, which may affect our customers’ activity levels, and spending for our products and services; and
  • natural disasters.

The oil and gas industry has historically experienced periodic downturns, which have been characterized by diminished demand for oilfield services and downward pressure on the prices we charge. While oil and natural gas prices have recently started to rebound from the downturn that began in 2014, the market remains quite volatile and the sustainability of the price recovery and business activity levels is dependent on variables beyond our control, such as geopolitical stability, OPEC’s actions to regulate its production capacity, changes in demand patterns, and international sanctions and tariffs. Continued volatility or any future reduction in demand for oilfield services and could further adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

Our success depends on our ability to develop, implement, and protect new technologies and services.

Our success depends on the ongoing development and implementation of new product designs, including the processes used by us to produce and market our products, and on our ability to protect and maintain critical intellectual property assets related to these developments. If we are not able to obtain patent, trade secret or other protection of our intellectual property rights, if our patents are unenforceable or the claims allowed under our patents are not sufficient to protect our technology, or if we are not able to adequately protect our patents or trade secrets, we may not be able to continue to develop our services, products and related technologies. Additionally, our competitors may be able to independently develop technology that is similar to ours without infringing on our patents or gaining access to our trade secrets. If any of these events occurs, we may be unable to meet evolving industry requirements or do so at prices acceptable to our customers, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

The industries in which we operate or have operated expose us to potential liabilities, including the installation or use of our products, which may not be covered by insurance or may be in excess of policy limits, or for which expected recoveries may not be realized.

We are subject to potential liabilities arising from, among other possibilities, equipment malfunctions, equipment misuse, personal injuries, and natural disasters, any of which may result in hazardous situations, including uncontrollable flows of gas or well fluids, fires, and explosions. Although we have obtained insurance against many of these risks, our insurance may not be adequate to cover our liabilities. Further, the insurance may not generally be available in the future or, if available, premiums may not be commercially justifiable. If we incur substantial liability and the damages are not covered by insurance or are in excess of policy limits, or if we were to incur liability at a time when we are not able to obtain liability insurance, such potential liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.

We may lose money on fixed-price contracts.

As customary for some of our projects, we often agree to provide products and services under fixed-price contracts. We are subject to material risks in connection with such fixed-price contracts. It is not possible to estimate with complete certainty the final cost or margin of a project at the time of bidding or during the early phases of its execution. Actual expenses incurred in executing these fixed-price contracts can vary substantially from those originally anticipated for several reasons including, but not limited to, the following:

  • unforeseen additional costs related to the purchase of substantial equipment necessary for contract fulfillment or labor shortages in the markets for where the contracts are performed;
  • mechanical failure of our production equipment and machinery;
  • delays caused by local weather conditions and/or natural disasters (including earthquakes and floods); and
  • a failure of suppliers, subcontractors, or joint venture partners to perform their contractual obligations.

The realization of any material risks and unforeseen circumstances could also lead to delays in the execution schedule of a project. We may be held liable to a customer should we fail to meet project milestones or deadlines or to comply with other contractual provisions. Additionally, delays in certain projects could lead to delays in subsequent projects for which production equipment and machinery currently being utilized on a project were intended.

Pursuant to the terms of fixed-price contracts, we are not always able to increase the price of the contract to reflect factors that were unforeseen at the time its bid was submitted, and this risk may be heightened for projects with longer terms. Depending on the size of a project, variations from estimated contract performance, or variations in multiple contracts, could have a significant impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

New capital asset construction projects for vessels and manufacturing facilities are subject to risks, including delays and cost overruns, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, or results of operations.

We regularly carry out capital asset construction projects to maintain, upgrade, and develop our asset base, and such projects are subject to risks of delay and cost overruns that are inherent to any large construction project, and are the result of numerous factors including, but not limited to, the following:

  • shortages of key equipment, materials or skilled labor;
  • unscheduled delays in the delivery or ordered materials and equipment;
  • design and engineering issues; and
  • shipyard delays and performance issues.

Failure to complete construction in time, or the inability to complete construction in accordance with its design specifications, may result in loss of revenue. Additionally, capital expenditures for construction projects could materially exceed the initially planned investments or can result in delays in putting such assets into operation.

Our failure to timely deliver our backlog could affect future sales, profitability, and relationships with our customers.

Many of the contracts we enter into with our customers require long manufacturing lead times due to complex technical and logistical requirements. These contracts may contain clauses related to liquidated damages or financial incentives regarding on-time delivery, and a failure by us to deliver in accordance with customer expectations could subject us to liquidated damages or loss of financial incentives, reduce our margins on these contracts, or result in damage to existing customer relationships. The ability to meet customer delivery schedules for this backlog is dependent upon a number of factors, including, but not limited to, access to the raw materials required for production, an adequately trained and capable workforce, subcontractor performance, project engineering expertise and execution, sufficient manufacturing plant capacity, and appropriate planning and scheduling of manufacturing resources. Failure to deliver backlog in accordance with expectations could negatively impact our financial performance.

We face risks relating to our reliance on subcontractors, suppliers, and our joint venture partners.

We generally rely on subcontractors, suppliers, and our joint venture partners for the performance of our contracts. Although we are not dependent upon any single supplier, certain geographic areas of our business or a project or group of projects may depend heavily on certain suppliers for raw materials or semi-finished goods.

Any difficulty in engaging suitable subcontractors or acquiring equipment and materials could compromise our ability to generate a significant margin on a project or to complete such project within the allocated timeframe. If subcontractors, suppliers or joint venture partners refuse to adhere to their contractual obligations with us or are unable to do so due to a deterioration of their financial condition, we may be unable to find a suitable replacement at a comparable price, or at all. Moreover, the failure of one of our joint venture partners to perform their obligations in a timely and satisfactory manner could lead to additional obligations and costs being imposed on us as we may be obligated to assume our defaulting partner’s obligations or compensate our customers.

Any delay, failure to meet contractual obligations, or other event beyond our control or not foreseeable by us, that is attributable to a subcontractor, supplier or joint venture partner, could lead to delays in the overall progress of the project and/or generate significant extra costs. Even if we are entitled to make a claim for these extra costs against the defaulting supplier, subcontractor or joint venture partner, we may be unable to recover the entirety of these costs and this could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Our businesses are dependent on the continuing services of certain of our key managers and employees.

We depend on key personnel. The loss of any key personnel could adversely impact our business if we are unable to implement key strategies or transactions in their absence. The loss of qualified employees or failure to retain and motivate additional highly-skilled employees required for the operation and expansion of our business could hinder our ability to successfully conduct research activities and develop marketable products and services.

Pirates endanger our maritime employees and assets.

We face material piracy risks in the Gulf of Guinea, the Somali Basin, and the Gulf of Aden, and, to a lesser extent, in Southeast Asia, Malacca, and the Singapore Straits. Piracy represents a risk for both our projects and our vessels, which operate and transport through sensitive maritime areas. Such risks have the potential to significantly harm our crews and to negatively impact the execution schedule for our projects. If our maritime employees or assets are endangered, additional time may be required to find an alternative solution, which may delay project realization and negatively impact our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Seasonal and weather conditions could adversely affect demand for our services and operations.

Our business may be materially affected by variation from normal weather patterns, such as cooler or warmer summers and winters. Adverse weather conditions, such as hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico or extreme winter conditions in Canada, Russia, and the North Sea, may interrupt or curtail our operations, or our customers’ operations, cause supply disruptions or loss of productivity, and may result in a loss of revenue or damage to our equipment and facilities, which may or may not be insured. Any of these events or outcomes could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, cash flows, and results of operations.

Due to the types of contracts we enter into and the markets in which we operate, the cumulative loss of several major contracts, customers, or alliances may have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

We often enter into large, long-term contracts that, collectively, represent a significant portion of our revenue. These agreements, if terminated or breached, may have a larger impact on our operating results or our financial condition than shorter-term contracts due to the value at risk. Moreover, the global market for the production, transportation, and transformation of hydrocarbons and by-products, as well as the other industrial markets in which we operate, is dominated by a small number of companies. As a result, our business relies on a limited number of customers. If we were to lose several key contracts, customers, or alliances over a relatively short period of time, we could experience a significant adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

Our operations require us to comply with numerous regulations, violations of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

Our operations and manufacturing activities are governed by international, regional, transnational, and national laws and regulations in every place where we operate relating to matters such as environmental protection, health and safety, labor and employment, import/export controls, currency exchange, bribery and corruption, and taxation. These laws and regulations are complex, frequently change, and have tended to become more stringent over time. In the event the scope of these laws and regulations expand in the future, the incremental cost of compliance could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

Our international operations are subject to anti-corruption laws and regulations, such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), the U.K. Bribery Act of 2010 (the “Bribery Act”), the anti-corruption provisions of French law n° 2016-1691 dated December 9, 2016 relating to Transparency, Anti-corruption and Modernization of the Business Practice (“Sapin II Law”), the Brazilian Anti-Bribery Act (also known as the Brazilian Clean Company Act), and economic and trade sanctions, including those administered by the United Nations, the European Union, the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the U.S. Department of the Treasury (“U.S. Treasury”), and the U.S. Department of State. The FCPA prohibits providing anything of value to foreign officials for the purposes of obtaining or retaining business or securing any improper business advantage. We may deal with both governments and state-owned business enterprises, the employees of which are considered foreign officials for purposes of the FCPA. The provisions of the Bribery Act extend beyond bribery of foreign public officials and are more onerous than the FCPA in a number of other respects, including jurisdiction, non-exemption of facilitation payments, and penalties. Economic and trade sanctions restrict our transactions or dealings with certain sanctioned countries, territories, and designated persons.

As a result of doing business in foreign countries, including through partners and agents, we are exposed to a risk of violating anti-corruption laws and sanctions regulations. Some of the international locations in which we currently or may, in the future, operate, have developing legal systems and may have higher levels of corruption than more developed nations. Our continued expansion and worldwide operations, including in developing countries, our development of joint venture relationships worldwide, and the employment of local agents in the countries in which we operate increases the risk of violations of anti-corruption laws and economic and trade sanctions. Violations of anti-corruption laws and economic and trade sanctions are punishable by civil penalties, including fines, denial of export privileges, injunctions, asset seizures, debarment from government contracts (and termination of existing contracts), and revocations or restrictions of licenses, as well as criminal fines and imprisonment. In addition, any major violations could have a significant impact on our reputation and consequently on our ability to win future business.

We have implemented internal controls designed to minimize and detect potential violations of laws and regulations in a timely manner but we can provide no assurance that such policies and procedures will be followed at all times or will effectively detect and prevent violations of the applicable laws by one or more of our employees, consultants, agents, or partners. The occurrence of any such violation could subject us to penalties and material adverse consequences on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Compliance with environmental laws and regulations may adversely affect our business and results of operations.

Environmental laws and regulations in various countries affect the equipment, systems, and services we design, market, and sell, as well as the facilities where we manufacture our equipment and systems, and any other operations we undertake. We are required to invest financial and managerial resources to comply with environmental laws and regulations, and believe that we will continue to be required to do so in the future. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations may result in the assessment of administrative, civil, and criminal penalties, the imposition of remedial obligations, the issuance of orders enjoining our operations, or other claims. These laws and regulations, as well as the adoption of new legal requirements or other laws and regulations affecting exploration and development of drilling for crude oil and natural gas, are becoming increasingly strict and could adversely affect our business and operating results by increasing our costs, limiting the demand for our products and services, or restricting our operations.

Existing or future laws and regulations relating to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change may adversely affect our business.

Existing or future laws concerning the release of greenhouse gas emissions or that concern climate change (including laws and regulations that seek to mitigate the effects of climate change) may adversely impact demand for the equipment, systems and services we design, market and sell. For example, oil and natural gas exploration and production may decline as a result of such laws and regulations and as a consequence demand for our equipment, systems and services may also decline. In addition, such laws and regulations may also result in more onerous obligations with respect to our operations, including the facilities where we manufacture our equipment and systems. Such decline in demand for our equipment, systems and services and such onerous obligations in respect of our operations may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Disruptions in the political, regulatory, economic, and social conditions of the countries in which we conduct business could adversely affect our business or results of operations.

We operate in various countries across the world. Instability and unforeseen changes in any of the markets in which we conduct business, including economically and politically volatile areas could have an adverse effect on the demand for our services and products, our financial condition, or our results of operations. These factors include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • nationalization and expropriation;
  • potentially burdensome taxation;
  • inflationary and recessionary markets, including capital and equity markets;
  • civil unrest, labor issues, political instability, terrorist attacks, cyber-terrorism, military activity, and wars;
  • supply disruptions in key oil producing countries;
  • the ability of OPEC to set and maintain production levels and pricing;
  • trade restrictions, trade protection measures, price controls, or trade disputes;
  • sanctions, such as prohibitions or restrictions by the United States against countries that are the targets of economic sanctions, or are designated as state sponsors of terrorism;
  • foreign ownership restrictions;
  • import or export licensing requirements;
  • restrictions on operations, trade practices, trade partners, and investment decisions resulting from domestic and foreign laws, and regulations;
  • regime changes;
  • changes in, and the administration of, treaties, laws, and regulations;
  • inability to repatriate income or capital;
  • reductions in the availability of qualified personnel;
  • foreign currency fluctuations or currency restrictions; and
  • fluctuations in the interest rate component of forward foreign currency rates.

DTC and Euroclear Paris may cease to act as depository and clearing agencies for our shares.

Our shares were issued into the facilities of The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) with respect to shares listed on the NYSE and Euroclear with respect to shares listed on Euronext Paris (DTC and Euroclear being referred to as the “Clearance Services”). The Clearance Services are widely used mechanisms that allow for rapid electronic transfers of securities between the participants in their respective systems, which include many large banks and brokerage firms. The Clearance Services have general discretion to cease to act as a depository and clearing agencies for our shares. If either of the Clearance Services determine at any time that our shares are not eligible for continued deposit and clearance within its facilities, then we believe that our shares would not be eligible for continued listing on the NYSE or Euronext Paris, as applicable, and trading in our shares would be disrupted. Any such disruption could have a material adverse effect on the trading price of our shares.

The United Kingdom’s proposed withdrawal from the European Union may have a negative effect on global economic conditions, financial markets, and our business.

We are based in the United Kingdom and have operational headquarters in Paris, France; Houston, Texas, United States; and in London, United Kingdom, with worldwide operations, including material business operations in Europe. In June 2016, a majority of voters in the United Kingdom elected to withdraw from the European Union in a national referendum (“Brexit”). The referendum was advisory, and the United Kingdom government served notice under Article 50 of the Treaty of the European Union in March 2017 to formally initiate a withdrawal process. The United Kingdom and the European Union have had a two-year period under Article 50 to negotiate the terms for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union. The withdrawal agreement and political declaration that were endorsed at a special meeting of the European Council on November 25, 2018 did not receive the approval of the United Kingdom Parliament in January 2019. Further discussions are ongoing, although the European Commission has stated that the European Union will not reopen the withdrawal agreement. Any extension of the negotiation period for withdrawal will require the consent of the remaining 27 member states of the European Union. Brexit has created significant uncertainty about the future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union and has given rise to calls for certain regions within the United Kingdom to preserve their place in the European Union by separating from the United Kingdom.

These developments, or the perception that any of them could occur, could have a material adverse effect on global economic conditions and the stability of the global financial markets and could significantly reduce global market liquidity and restrict the ability of key market participants to operate in certain financial markets. Asset valuations, currency exchange rates, and credit ratings may be especially subject to increased market volatility. Lack of clarity about applicable future laws, regulations, or treaties as the United Kingdom negotiates the terms of a withdrawal, as well as the operation of any such rules pursuant to any withdrawal terms, including financial laws and regulations, tax and free trade agreements, intellectual property rights, supply chain logistics, environmental, health and safety laws and regulations, immigration laws, employment laws, and other rules that would apply to us and our subsidiaries, could increase our costs, restrict our access to capital within the United Kingdom and the European Union, depress economic activity, and further decrease foreign direct investment in the United Kingdom. For example, withdrawal from the European Union could, depending on the negotiated terms of such withdrawal, eliminate the benefit of certain tax-related E.U. directives currently applicable to U.K. companies such as us, including the Parent-Subsidiary Directive and the Interest and Royalties Directive, which could, subject to any relief under an available tax treaty, raise our tax costs.

If the United Kingdom and the European Union are unable to negotiate mutually acceptable withdrawal terms or if other E.U. member states pursue withdrawal, barrier-free access between the United Kingdom and other E.U. member states or within the European Economic Area overall could be diminished or eliminated. Any of these factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

As an English public limited company, we must meet certain additional financial requirements before we may declare dividends or repurchase shares and certain capital structure decisions may require stockholder approval which may limit our flexibility to manage our capital structure.We may not be able to pay dividends or repurchase shares of our ordinary shares in accordance with our announced intent, or at all.

Under English law, we will only be able to declare dividends, make distributions, or repurchase shares (other than out of the proceeds of a new issuance of shares for that purpose) out of “distributable profits.” Distributable profits are a company’s accumulated, realized profits, to the extent that they have not been previously utilized by distribution or capitalization, less its accumulated, realized losses, to the extent that they have not been previously written off in a reduction or reorganization of capital duly made. In addition, as a public limited company incorporated in England and Wales, we may only make a distribution if the amount of our net assets is not less than the aggregate of our called-up share capital and non-distributable reserves and to the extent that the distribution does not reduce the amount of those assets to less than that aggregate.

Following the Merger, we implemented a court-approved reduction of our capital, which was completed on June 29, 2017, in order to create distributable profits to support the payment of possible future dividends or future share repurchases. Our articles of association permit us by ordinary resolution of the stockholders to declare dividends, provided that the directors have made a recommendation as to its amount. The dividend shall not exceed the amount recommended by the Board of Directors. The directors may also decide to pay interim dividends if it appears to them that the profits available for distribution justify the payment. When recommending or declaring payment of a dividend, the directors are required under English law to comply with their duties, including considering our future financial requirements.

In addition, the Board of Directors’ determinations regarding dividends and share repurchases will depend on a variety of other factors, including our net income, cash flow generated from operations or other sources, liquidity position, and potential alternative uses of cash, such as acquisitions, as well as economic conditions and expected future financial results. Our ability to declare and pay future dividends and make future share repurchases will depend on our future financial performance, which in turn depends on the successful implementation of our strategy and on financial, competitive, regulatory, technical, and other factors, general economic conditions, demand and selling prices for our products and services, and other factors specific to our industry or specific projects, many of which are beyond our control. Therefore, our ability to generate cash depends on the performance of our operations and could be limited by decreases in our profitability or increases in costs, regulatory changes, capital expenditures, or debt servicing requirements.

Any failure to pay dividends or repurchase shares of our ordinary shares could negatively impact our reputation, harm investor confidence in us, and cause the market price of our ordinary shares to decline.

Our existing and future debt may limit cash flow available to invest in the ongoing needs of our business and could prevent us from fulfilling our obligations under our outstanding debt.

We have substantial existing debt. As of December 31, 2018, after giving effect to the Merger, our total debt is $4.2 billion. We also have the capacity under our $2.5 billion credit facility, in addition to our bilateral facilities to incur substantial additional debt. Our level of debt could have important consequences. For example, it could:

  • make it more difficult for us to make payments on our debt;
  • require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to the payment of debt service, reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, distributions, and other general partnership purposes;
  • increase our vulnerability to adverse economic or industry conditions;
  • limit our ability to obtain additional financing to enable us to react to changes in our business; or
  • place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to businesses in our industry that have less debt.

Additionally, any failure to meet required payments on our debt or to comply with any covenants in the instruments governing our debt, could result in an event of default under the terms of those instruments. In the event of such default, the holders of such debt could elect to declare all the amounts outstanding under such instruments to be due and payable.

The London Inter-bank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) and certain other interest “benchmarks” may be subject to regulatory guidance and/or reform that could cause interest rates under our current or future debt agreements to perform differently than in the past or cause other unanticipated consequences. The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, has announced that it intends to stop encouraging or requiring banks to submit LIBOR rates after 2021, and it is unclear if LIBOR will cease to exist or if new methods of calculating LIBOR will evolve. If LIBOR ceases to exist or if the methods of calculating LIBOR change from their current form, interest rates on our current or future debt obligations may be adversely affected.

A downgrade in our debt rating could restrict our ability to access the capital markets.

The terms of our financing are, in part, dependent on the credit ratings assigned to our debt by independent credit rating agencies. We cannot provide assurance that any of our current credit ratings will remain in effect for any given period of time or that a rating will not be lowered or withdrawn entirely by a rating agency. Factors that may impact our credit ratings include debt levels, capital structure, planned asset purchases or sales, near- and long-term production growth opportunities, market position, liquidity, asset quality, cost structure, product mix, customer and geographic diversification, and commodity price levels. A downgrade in our credit ratings, particularly to non-investment grade levels, could limit our ability to access the debt capital markets or refinance our existing debt or cause us to refinance or issue debt with less favorable terms and conditions. Moreover, our revolving credit agreement includes an increase in interest rates if the ratings for our debt are downgraded, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations. An increase in the level of our indebtedness and related interest costs may increase our vulnerability to adverse general economic and industry conditions and may affect our ability to obtain additional financing, as well as have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Uninsured claims and litigation against us, including intellectual property litigation, could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

We could be impacted by the outcome of pending litigation, as well as unexpected litigation or proceedings. We have insurance coverage against operating hazards, including product liability claims and personal injury claims related to our products or operating environments in which our employees operate, to the extent deemed prudent by our management and to the extent insurance is available. However, our insurance policies are subject to exclusions, limitations, and other conditions and may not apply in all cases, for example where willful wrongdoing on our part is alleged. Additionally, the nature and amount of that insurance may not be sufficient to fully indemnify us against liabilities arising out of pending and future claims and litigation. Additionally, in individual circumstances, certain proceedings or cases may also lead to our formal or informal exclusion from tenders or the revocation or loss of business licenses or permits. Our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows could be adversely affected by unexpected claims not covered by insurance.

In addition, the tools, techniques, methodologies, programs, and components we use to provide our services may infringe upon the intellectual property rights of others. Infringement claims generally result in significant legal and other costs. The resolution of these claims could require us to enter into license agreements or develop alternative technologies. The development of these technologies or the payment of royalties under licenses from third parties, if available, would increase our costs. If a license were not available, or we are not able to develop alternative technologies, we might not be able to continue providing a particular service or product, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

Currency exchange rate fluctuations could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

We conduct operations around the world in many different currencies. Because a significant portion of our revenue is denominated in currencies other than our reporting currency, the U.S. dollar, changes in exchange rates will produce fluctuations in our revenue, costs, and earnings, and may also affect the book value of our assets and liabilities and related equity. Although we do not hedge translation impacts on earnings, we do hedge transaction impacts on margins and earnings where the transaction is not in the functional currency of the business unit. Our efforts to minimize our currency exposure through such hedging transactions may not be successful depending on market and business conditions. Moreover, certain currencies in which the Company trades, specifically currencies in countries such as Angola and Nigeria, do not actively trade in the global foreign exchange markets and may subject us to increased foreign currency exposures. As a result, fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

We may incur significant Merger-related costs.

We have incurred and expect to incur additional non-recurring direct and indirect costs associated with the Merger. In addition to the costs and expenses associated with the consummation of the Merger, we are also integrating processes, policies, procedures, operations, technologies, and systems. While we have assumed that a certain level of expenses would be incurred relating to the Merger and continue to assess the magnitude of these costs, there are many factors beyond our control that could affect the total amount or the timing of the integration and implementation expenses. These costs and expenses could reduce the realization of efficiencies and strategic benefits we expect to achieve from the Merger, and the expected net benefit of the Merger may not be achieved in the near term or at all.

Our acquisition and divestiture activities involve substantial risks.

We have made and expect to continue to pursue acquisitions, dispositions, or other investments that may strategically fit our business and/or growth objectives. We cannot provide assurances that we will be able to locate suitable acquisitions, dispositions, or investments, or that we will be able to consummate any such transactions on terms and conditions acceptable to us. Even if we do successfully execute such transactions, they may not result in anticipated benefits, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial results. If we are unable to successfully integrate and develop acquired businesses, we could fail to achieve anticipated synergies and cost savings, including any expected increases in revenues and operating results. We may not be able to successfully cause a buyer of a divested business to assume the liabilities of that business or, even if such liabilities are assumed, we may have difficulties enforcing our rights, contractual or otherwise, against the buyer. We may invest in companies or businesses that fail, causing a loss of all or part of our investment. In addition, if we determine that an other-than-temporary decline in the fair value exists for a company in which we have invested, we may have to write down that investment to its fair value and recognize the related write-down as an investment loss.

A failure of our IT infrastructure, including as a result of cyber attacks, could adversely impact our business and results of operations.

The efficient operation of our business is dependent on our IT systems. Accordingly, we rely upon the capacity, reliability, and security of our IT hardware and software infrastructure and our ability to expand and update this infrastructure in response to changing needs. We have been subject to cyber attacks in the past, including phishing, malware, and ransomware, and although no such attack has had a material adverse effect on our business, this may not be the case with future attacks. Our systems may be vulnerable to damages from such attacks, as well as from natural disasters, failures in hardware or software, power fluctuations, unauthorized access to data and systems, loss or destruction of data (including confidential customer information), human error, and other similar disruptions, and we cannot give assurance that any security measures we have implemented or may in the future implement will be sufficient to identify and prevent or mitigate such disruptions.

We rely on third parties to support the operation of our IT hardware, software infrastructure, and cloud services, and in certain instances, utilize web-based and software-as-a-service applications. The security and privacy measures implemented by such third parties, as well as the measures implemented by any entities we acquire or with whom we do business, may not be sufficient to identify or prevent cyber attacks, and any such attacks may have a material adverse effect on our business. While our IT vendor agreements typically contain provisions that seek to eliminate or limit our exposure to liability for damages from a cyber-attack, we cannot ensure such provisions will withstand legal challenges or cover all or any such damages.

Threats to our IT systems arise from numerous sources, not all of which are within our control, including fraud or malice on the part of third parties, accidental technological failure, electrical or telecommunication outages, failures of computer servers or other damage to our property or assets, outbreaks of hostilities, or terrorist acts. The failure of our IT systems or those of our vendors to perform as anticipated for any reason or any significant breach of security could disrupt our business and result in numerous adverse consequences, including reduced effectiveness and efficiency of operations, inappropriate disclosure of confidential and proprietary information, reputational harm, increased overhead costs, and loss of important information, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. In addition, we may be required to incur significant costs to protect against damage caused by these disruptions or security breaches in the future. Our insurance coverage may not cover all of the costs and liabilities we incur as the result of any disruptions or security breaches, and if our business continuity and/or disaster recovery plans do not effectively and timely resolve issues resulting from a cyber-attack, we may suffer material adverse effects on our business.

We are subject to governmental regulation and other legal obligations related to privacy, data protection, and data security. Our actual or perceived failure to comply with such obligations could harm our business.

We are subject to international data protection laws, such as the General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, in the European Economic Area. The GDPR imposes several stringent requirements for controllers and processors of personal data which have increased our obligations, including, for example, by requiring more robust disclosures to individuals, notifications, in some cases, of data breaches to regulators and data subjects, and a record of processing and other policies and procedures to be maintained to adhere to the accountability principle. In addition, we are subject to the GDPR’s rules on transferring personal data outside of the EEA (including to the United States), and some of these rules are currently being challenged in the courts. Failure to comply with the requirements of GDPR and the local laws implementing or supplementing the GDPR could result in fines of up to €20,000,000 or up to 4% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is higher, as well as other administrative penalties. We are likely to be required to expend significant capital and other resources to ensure ongoing compliance with the GDPR and other applicable data protection legislation, and we may be required to put in place additional control mechanisms which could be onerous and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.

We may not realize the cost savings, synergies, and other benefits expected from the Merger.

The combination of two independent companies is a complex, costly, and time-consuming process. As a result, we will be required to continue to devote management attention and resources to integrating the business practices and operations of Technip and FMC Technologies. The integration process may disrupt our businesses and, if ineffectively implemented, could preclude realization of the full benefits expected from the Merger. Our failure to meet the challenges involved in successfully integrating the operations of Technip and FMC Technologies or otherwise realize the anticipated benefits of the Merger could interrupt, and seriously harm the results of, our operations. In addition, the overall integration of Technip and FMC Technologies may result in unanticipated expenses, liabilities, competitive responses, loss of client relationships, diversion of management’s attention, or other problems, and such problems could, if material, cause our stock price to decline. The difficulties of combining the operations of Technip and FMC Technologies include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • managing a significantly larger company;
  • coordinating geographically separate organizations;
  • the potential diversion of management focus and resources from other strategic opportunities and from operational matters;
  • aligning and executing our strategy;
  • retaining existing customers and attracting new customers;
  • maintaining employee morale and retaining key management and other employees;
  • integrating two unique business cultures,
  • the possibility of faulty assumptions underlying expectations regarding the integration process;
  • consolidating corporate and administrative infrastructures and eliminating duplicative operations;
  • coordinating distribution and marketing efforts;
  • integrating IT, communications, and other systems;
  • changes in applicable laws and regulations;
  • managing tax costs or inefficiencies associated with integrating our operations;
  • unforeseen expenses or delays associated with the Merger; and
  • taking actions that may be required in connection with obtaining regulatory approvals.

Many of these factors are at least partially outside our control and any one of them could result in increased costs, decreased revenue, and diversion of management’s time and energy, which could materially impact our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In addition, even if the operations of Technip and FMC Technologies are successfully integrated, we may not realize the full benefits of the Merger, including the synergies, cost savings, sales, or growth opportunities that we expect. These benefits may not be achieved within the anticipated time frame, or at all. As a result, the combination of Technip and FMC Technologies may not result in the realization of the full benefits expected from the Merger.

The IRS may not agree that we should be treated as a foreign corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes and may seek to impose an excise tax on gains recognized by certain individuals.

Although we are incorporated in the United Kingdom, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) may assert that we should be treated as a U.S. “domestic” corporation (and, therefore, a U.S. tax resident) for U.S. federal income tax purposes pursuant to Section 7874 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). For U.S. federal income tax purposes, a corporation (i) is generally considered a “domestic” corporation (or U.S. tax resident) if it is organized in the United States or of any state or political subdivision therein, and (ii) is generally considered a “foreign” corporation (or non-U.S. tax resident) if it is not considered a domestic corporation. Because we are a U.K. incorporated entity, we would be considered a foreign corporation (and, therefore, a non-U.S. tax resident) under these rules. Section 7874 of the Code (“Section 7874”) provides an exception under which a foreign incorporated entity may, in certain circumstances, be treated as a domestic corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

We do not believe this exception applies. However, the Section 7874 rules are complex and subject to detailed regulations, the application of which is uncertain in various respects. It is possible that the IRS will not agree with our position. Should the IRS successfully challenge our position, it is also possible that an excise tax under Section 4985 of the Code (the “Section 4985 Excise Tax”) may be assessed against certain “disqualified individuals” (including former officers and directors of FMC Technologies, Inc.) on certain stock-based compensation held thereby. We may, if we determine that it is appropriate, provide disqualified individuals with a payment with respect to the Section 4985 Excise Tax, so that, on a net after-tax basis, they would be in the same position as if no such Section 4985 Excise Tax had been applied.

In addition, there can be no assurance that there will not be a change in law or interpretation, including with retroactive effect, that might cause us to be treated as a domestic corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

U.S. tax laws and/or guidance could affect our ability to engage in certain acquisition strategies and certain internal restructurings.

Even if we are treated as a foreign corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, Section 7874, U.S. Treasury regulations, and other guidance promulgated thereunder may adversely affect our ability to engage in certain future acquisitions of U.S. businesses or to restructure the non-U.S. members of our group. These limitations, if applicable, may affect the tax efficiencies that otherwise might be achieved in such potential future transactions or restructurings.

In addition, the IRS and the U.S. Treasury have issued final and temporary regulations providing that, even if we are treated as a foreign corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, certain intercompany debt instruments issued on or after April 4, 2016 will be treated as equity for U.S. federal income tax purposes, therefore limiting U.S. tax benefits and resulting in possible U.S. withholding taxes. Although recent guidance from the U.S. Treasury proposes deferring certain documentation requirements that would otherwise be imposed with respect to covered debt instruments, and further indicates that these rules generally are the subject of continuing study and may be further materially modified, the current regulations may adversely affect our future effective tax rate and could also impact our ability to engage in future restructurings if such transactions cause an existing intercompany debt instrument to be treated as reissued for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

We are subject to the tax laws of numerous jurisdictions; challenges to the interpretation of, or future changes to, such laws could adversely affect us.

We and our subsidiaries are subject to tax laws and regulations in the United Kingdom, the United States, France, and numerous other jurisdictions in which we and our subsidiaries operate. These laws and regulations are inherently complex, and we are, and will continue to be, obligated to make judgments and interpretations about the application of these laws and regulations to our operations and businesses. The interpretation and application of these laws and regulations could be challenged by the relevant governmental authorities, which could result in administrative or judicial procedures, actions, or sanctions, which could be material.

In addition, the U.S. Congress, the U.K. Government, the European Union, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (the “OECD”), and other government agencies in jurisdictions where we and our affiliates do business have had an extended focus on issues related to the taxation of multinational corporations. New tax initiatives, directives, and rules, such as the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the OECD’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting initiative, and the European Union’s Anti-Tax Avoidance Directives, may increase our tax burden and require additional compliance-related expenditures. As a result, our financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows may be adversely affected. Further changes, including with retroactive effect, in the tax laws of the United States, the United Kingdom, the European Union, or other countries in which we and our affiliates do business could also adversely affect us.

We may not qualify for benefits under tax treaties entered into between the United Kingdom and other countries.

We operate in a manner such that we believe we are eligible for benefits under tax treaties between the United Kingdom and other countries. However, our ability to qualify for such benefits will depend on whether we are treated as a U.K. tax resident, the requirements contained in each treaty and applicable domestic laws, on the facts and circumstances surrounding our operations and management, and on the relevant interpretation of the tax authorities and courts. For example, because of the anticipated withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union (“Brexit”), we may lose some or all of the benefits of tax treaties between the United States and the remaining members of the European Union, and face higher tax liabilities, which may be significant. Another example is the Multilateral Convention to Implement Tax Treaty Related Measures to Prevent Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (the “MLI”), which entered into force for participating jurisdictions on July 1, 2018. The MLI recommends that countries adopt a “limitation-on-benefit” rule and/or a “principle purposes test” rule with regards to their tax treaties. The scope and interpretation of these rules as adopted pursuant to the MLI are presently under development, but the application of either rule might deny us tax treaty benefits that were previously available.

The failure by us or our subsidiaries to qualify for benefits under tax treaties entered into between the United Kingdom and other countries could result in adverse tax consequences to us (including an increased tax burden and increased filing obligations) and could result in certain tax consequences of owning and disposing of our shares.

We intend to be treated exclusively as a resident of the United Kingdom for tax purposes, but French or other tax authorities may seek to treat us as a tax resident of another jurisdiction.

We are incorporated in the United Kingdom. English law currently provides that we will be regarded as a U.K. resident for tax purposes from incorporation and shall remain so unless (i) we are concurrently a resident in another jurisdiction (applying the tax residence rules of that jurisdiction) that has a double tax treaty with the United Kingdom and (ii) there is a tiebreaker provision in that tax treaty which allocates exclusive residence to that other jurisdiction.

In this regard, we have a permanent establishment in France to satisfy certain French tax requirements imposed by the French Tax Code with respect to the Merger. Although it is intended that we will be treated as having our exclusive place of tax residence in the United Kingdom, the French tax authorities may claim that we are a tax resident of France if we were to fail to maintain our “place of effective management” in the United Kingdom. Any such claim would be settled between the French and U.K. tax authorities pursuant to the mutual assistance procedure provided for by the tax treaty concluded between France and the United Kingdom. There is no assurance that these authorities would reach an agreement that we will remain exclusively a U.K. tax resident; a determination which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and future prospects. A failure to maintain exclusive tax residency in the United Kingdom could result in adverse tax consequences to us and our subsidiaries and could result in certain adverse changes in the tax consequences of owning and disposing of our shares.

The Company has identified material weaknesses relating to internal control over financial reporting. If our remedial measures are insufficient to address the material weaknesses, or if one or more additional material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting are discovered or occur in the future, our consolidated financial statements may contain material misstatements and we could be required to further restate our financial results, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

Management identified material weaknesses in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2018 as described in the Corporate Governance Report of this U.K. Annual Report.

A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

As a result of the material weaknesses, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2018. In addition, as a result of these material weaknesses, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer have concluded that, as of December 31, 2018, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective. Until these material weaknesses are remediated, they could lead to errors in our financial results and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

If our remedial measures are insufficient to address the material weaknesses, or if one or more additional material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting are discovered or occur in the future, our consolidated financial statements may contain material misstatements and we could be required to restate our financial results, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows, restrict our ability to access the capital markets, require significant resources to correct the weaknesses or deficiencies, subject us to fines, penalties or judgments, harm our reputation or otherwise cause a decline in investor confidence and in the market price of our stock.

Additional material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting could be identified in the future. Any failure to maintain or implement required new or improved controls, or any difficulties we encounter in their implementation, could result in additional significant deficiencies or material weaknesses, cause us to fail to meet our periodic reporting obligations or result in material misstatements in our financial statements. Any such failure could also adversely affect the results of periodic management evaluations and annual auditor attestation reports regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting required under Section 404 of the U.S. Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the rules promulgated under Section 404. The existence of a material weakness could result in errors in our financial statements that could result in a restatement of financial statements, cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations and cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, leading to, among other things, a decline in our stock price.

We can give no assurances that the measures we have taken to date, or any future measures we may take, will fully remediate the material weaknesses identified or that any additional material weaknesses will not arise in the future due to our failure to implement and maintain adequate internal control over financial reporting. In addition, even if we are successful in strengthening our controls and procedures, those controls and procedures may not be adequate to prevent or identify irregularities or ensure the fair and accurate presentation of our financial statements included in our periodic reports filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Appendix C – Related party transactions

Receivables, payables, revenues and expenses which are included in our consolidated financial statements for all transactions with related parties, defined as entities related to our directors and main shareholders as well as the partners of our consolidated joint ventures, were as follows.

Trade receivables consisted of receivables due from following related parties:

    December 31,
(In millions)   2018   2017
TP JGC Coral France SNC   $ 31.6     $ 42.5
Technip Odebrecht PLSV CV   10.9     13.8
Anadarko Petroleum Company   4.9     22.3
Others   14.3     19.8
Total trade receivables   $ 61.7     $ 98.4
               

TP JGC Coral France SNC and Technip Odebrecht PLSV CV are equity method affiliates. A member of our Board of Directors serves on the Board of Directors of Anadarko Petroleum Company.

Trade payables consisted of payables due to following related parties:

    December 31,
(In millions)   2018   2017
Dofcon Navegacao   $ 2.5     $ 12.3
Chiyoda   70.0     48.3
JGC Corporation   69.5     52.4
IFP Energies nouvelles   2.4    
Anadarko Petroleum Company   0.7    
Magma Global Limited   0.6    
Others   2.9     8.8
Total trade payables   $ 148.6     $ 121.8
               

Dofcon Navegacao and Magma Global Limited are equity affiliates. JGC Corporation and Chiyoda are joint venture partners on our Yamal project. A member of our Board of Directors is an executive officer of IFP Energies nouvelles.

Additionally, we have note receivable balance of $130.0 million and $140.9 million as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The note receivables balance includes $119.9 million and $114.9 million with Dofcon Brasil AS at December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Dofcon Brasil AS is accounted for as an equity method affiliate. These are included in other noncurrent assets on our consolidated balance sheets.

Revenue consisted of amount from following related parties:

(In millions)   2018   2017
Anadarko Petroleum Company   $ 124.8     $ 111.3
TP JGC Coral France SNC   $ 118.2     $ 69.9
Others   $ 50.3     $ 56.9
Total revenue   $ 293.3     $ 238.1
               

Expenses consisted of amount to following related parties:

(In millions)   2018   2017
Chiyoda   $ 53.0     $ 44.1
JGC Corporation   81.2     46.8
IFP Energy nouvelles   4.4    
Creowave OY   1.9     4.7
Arkema S.A.   2.6    
Magma Global Limited   3.0    
Others   8.6     45.8
Total expenses   $ 154.7     $ 141.4
               

LOAN RECEIVABLES – RELATED PARTIES

    December 31,
(In millions)   2018   2017
Loan receivables – related parties   $ 1,585.9     $ 2,425.0
               

In 2018, TechnipFMC Holdings Ltd repaid its loan for $700.0 million and Technip UK Ltd (“Technip UK”) and Technip Umbilicals repaid part of their intercompany loans for $51.6 million.

The Company’s loan receivables from related parties are unsecured and are stated net of impairment allowance of $4.7 million at December 31, 2018. As a result of applying IFRS 9, the Company did not restate the prior period.

Loan receivables from related parties primarily consist of loans to Technip Offshore International SAS (“TOI”), Technip UK and Asiaflex Products Sdn Bhd (“Asiaflex”). The terms and interest rates for significant loans are detailed below.

(i) Loans to TOI consist of two loans in the amount of $1,126.8 million and $118.3 million respectively with 5 year terms and interest rates of 4.16% and 2.10% respectively.

(ii) Loan to Technip UK is in the amount of $143.0 million with a 5 year term and interest rate of 2.05%.

(iii) Loan to Asiaflex is in the amount of $74.3 million with a 10 year term and interest rate of LIBOR 3M +1.1%.

LOAN PAYABLES – RELATED PARTIES

Loan payables – related parties consists of the following:

    December 31,
(In millions)   2018   2017
Loan payables - related parties   $ 5,417.3     $ 2,800.0
               

Loan payables to related parties are unsecured and consist of borrowings from TechnipFMC Holdings Ltd (“Holdings Ltd”), TechnipFMC US Holdings Inc (“US Holdings”), TechnipFMC International Ltd (“International Ltd”), TechnipFMC Finance ULC (“Finance ULC”), and TechnipFMC (Europe) Ltd (“Europe Ltd”). The terms and interest rates for significant loans are detailed below.

(i) Loans from Holdings Ltd primarily consist of two loans in the amount of $838.5 million and $545.8 million respectively with 5 year terms and interest rates of 4.68% and 2.69% respectively.

(ii) Loan from US Holdings is in the amount of $1,008.1 million with a 5 year term and interest rate of 4.83%.

(iii) Loan from International Ltd is in the amount of $2,076.1 million with a 5 year term and interest rate of 2.69%.

(iv) Loans from Finance ULC primarily consist of a loan in the amount of $389.4 million with a 5 year term and interest rate of 2.69%.

(v) Loan from Europe Ltd is in the amount of $350.0 million with a 5 year term and interest rate of 2.69%.

 

Source: TechnipFMC

Investor relations
Matt Seinsheimer
Vice President Investor Relations
Tel: +1 281 260 3665
Email: Matt Seinsheimer

Phillip Lindsay
Director Investor Relations Europe
Tel: +44 203 429 3929
Email: Phillip Lindsay

Media relations
Christophe Belorgeot
Vice President Corporate Communications
Tel: +33 1 47 78 39 92
Email: Christophe Belorgeot

Delphine Nayral
Manager Public Relations
Tel: +33 1 47 78 34 83
Email: Delphine Nayral